Aika Tanda

greyhound.jpg

Greyhound.com is the official website for greyhound bus that provides more than 2,300 destinations across North America. When you first access the website, you will see interface that prompts you to input destination to and fro, the time, number of tickets, and discount type so that you can search related schedules. The background changes randomly at each access, and the top page seems well-organized. There are tabs such as tickets & travel info, station locator, deals & discounts, road rewards, and new buses at the top so that you can navigate to the page you need.


The field where you input the date has calendar mark next to it so that the users can visualize which date they would like to schedule their trip on. The right side of the top page also lets you login if you have ever used this website, and it is very easy to figure out the link to benefits of signing up if you have not yet.


Although top page is well-organized and simple, it seems wordy and lengthy if you go to the travel info page. They should use more bullet points rather than long paragraphs. Although bold font makes it a little easier to follow, it is still troublesome to read the whole thing. It is very hard to navigate the information you need on some of the pages.
This website would improve if there is a link next to discount type field that leads users to a page that explains what kind of discounts are available. The pull-down menu has options such as military roundtrip discount, companion fare, student advantage, and veterans advantage, but with no explanation. It would be more helpful if the users know which discounts they qualify for.


What they should definitely improve on is the destination field on the top page. It lets you type in a desired city for “leaving from” and “going to” field, but simply typing any city won’t do. If you type in “College Park” for example, they don’t have any station in College Park so it does not bring up any pull-down menu to choose from. If you just leave it as it is and click “search schedules”, it prompts you to input the actual city. However, if you type in New York, the pull-down menu automatically comes up and shows three destinations: “New York, NY”, “New York Penn Sta, NY”, “New York Wall St, NY”. This is problem for the users who do not know where stations are located. Although you can go to the “station locator” tab above, it is still better if users can find destination without navigating away from the top page. They should change the interface so that users can type in any existing city, and it shows the closest station available from there.